What is Community Policing?

Community policing is a philosophy that promotes organizational strategies, which support the systematic use of partnerships and problem-solving techniques, to proactively address the immediate conditions that give rise to public safety issues such as crime, social disorder, and fear of crime.

 

The 2014 Award Submission Period

Deadline Extended

In its 16th year, the IACP/Cisco Community Policing Awards competition honors those departments worldwide that have prevented and decreased crime and terrorism by forging partnerships with their communities.

Submission Deadline: Midnight EST, June 22, 2014

Participating Departments & Citizens

Featured Blogs

Todd A. Miller: IACP Community Policing Committee Membership
As Chair of the IACP Community Policing Committee, it is my job, along with our VP of Oversight, to recommend...[read more]
Posted 06.25.14
Sandwich Police Department: What we've been up to.
While I have not written anything in quite a while. I do regularly read the posts and de iscussions from...[read more]
Posted 06.20.14
Steve : International Community Policing
I was fortunate enough to recently attend some police leadership training in Northern Ireland and Scotland with a group of...[read more]
Posted 06.02.14
Todd A. Miller: Promoting The Receipt of the IACP/Cisco Community Policing Award
After working diligently with our squad graphics designer, we have finally been able to place the IACP and Cisco Community...[read more]
Posted 05.29.14
View More

Latest News

Editorial - To fight crime, police need to be closer to the residents they protect
Posted on 29 July 2014

It doesn’t take much imagination to understand how community policing can make residents feel safer.

Byram Proposes Community Policing Policy
Posted on 28 July 2014

Vanderburgh Co. Sheriff Candidate Kirk Byram and Sheriff Dave Wedding talk about Community Policing.

Community policing 'gap' claimed
Posted on 27 July 2014

Community policing has disappeared "in all but name" in some areas as stretched teams are asked to cover the work of more than 9,000 axed colleagues, Labour will say.

see more